Tag: math

Interesting Question of the Day – 4 August 2017

This ant wants to go from point A to point B on this cube, in which each side is 4 inches.  (If you’re scared of huge ants, don’t worry, it’s not to scale.) To the nearest inch, what is the

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Interesting Question of the Day – 24 July 2017

We’re warming up with an easy math question today. On how many days of the year is the number of the day lower than the number of the month? The first new player to comment on the website with the

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Interesting Question of the Day – 17 April 2017

The number 666 is often used to represent all evil. If this is the case, then to the nearest whole number, what is the root of all evil.  (Specifically the square root of all evil.) The first new player to

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Interesting Question of the Day – 4 January 2017

Here is a picture of nine shots being lined up on an elliptical pool table. If you rule out problems with spin and friction and other variables, and deal purely with geometry, how many of these nine shots will go

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Interesting Question of the Day – 18 August 2016

How long would it take for the seasons to flip if we didn’t have leap years? The first new player to comment on the website with the correct answer wins a free drink at their next iQ Trivia show.

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Interesting Question of the Day – 1 March 2016

If you were to drop 32 balls into the top of this contraption and let them all fall through the pegs into the slots at the bottom, how many would you expect to end up in the two slots in

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Interesting Question of the Day – 15 February 2016

The standard prefix for millions is mega.  For billions, it’s giga.  Then there is tera, peta, exa, zetta, and yotta for septillions. What prefix has been proposed by Austin Sendek for octillions? The first new player to comment on the

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Interesting Question of the Day – 12 February 2016

Every time you fold a piece of paper in half you reduce its length by half and double its thickness. How many times did Britney Gallivan fold a piece of toilet paper over 1km in length to set the world

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Interesting Question of the Day – 14 October 2015

One week in 1980, Maureen Wilcox of America played the lottery twice, picked the correct numbers twice, but didn’t win anything. Why not?  (The odds on this are far more slim than winning the lottery.) The first player to comment

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Interesting Question of the Day – 29 June 2015

Here are three houses and electricity, gas, and water plants. Is it possible to link each house up to each utility on a flat surface, without crossing any of the lines or cutting through any of the houses. The first

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